News

This page features news in the area of children’s literature, events from around the blogging community, and announcements about KidLitosphere happenings. Primarily focused on literary news, special events, useful articles, and interesting posts from other blogs, it does not include reviews, interviews, or opinions.

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Wednesday
Jun152011

KidLitCon is now accepting presentation proposals!

The presentation submission process is now closed, but you can check out KidLitCon 2011’s slate of sessions here!

We are now accepting proposals for presentations at KidLitCon 2011!

We are looking for 50 minute presentations, panels, and keynotes that will appeal to and edify Kidlitosphere bloggers. Our goal is to provide a balanced selection for a wide range of interests and include, but are not limited to, topics of diversity, reviewing critically, evaluating illustrations, social media, marketing, and technology, and industry relationships. 

Proposals are due by July 15, 2011, so be sure to get your idea in soon!

We’ll only be accepting proposals submitted in the form found here.

(if questions on the proposal form seem familiar, it’s because we’ve stolen most of the questions from YALSA. Thanks YALSA!) 

Meanwhile, if you have any questions at all you can email them to us at kidlitcon@gmail.com

The 5th Annual KidLitCon will be happening September 16-17, 2011 in Seattle, WA.

Friday
Oct082010

Cybils, Carnival of Children's Literature, and Kidlitcon

From Jen Robinson’s Book Page

I have three can’t miss pieces of Kidlitosphere news to share today:

Cybils2010small 1. Nominations opened for the 2010 Cybils Awards this morning. Anyone can nominate titles (published from October 16, 2009 to October 15, 2010), one title per person per category. Here is the direct link to the nomination form. From the Cybils blog you can find up-to-the minute lists of nominated titles in each category (for example, Young Adult Fiction is here). Hundreds of titles have already been nominated. You have until October 15th to make sure that your favorites have been included. If you read a children’s or young adult book this year that you think was well-written and chock-full of kid-appeal, nominate it for the Cybils!

2. The September Carnival of Children’s Literature is now available at Great Kid Books. Host Mary Ann Scheuer has assembled a host of links from all around the Kidlitosphere, from news tidbits to book reviews to posts about writing. Mary Ann even took time to include cover images for the reviewed titles - a very nice touch! For fans of children’s literature, this Carnival is not to be missed.

3. The schedule has been announced for Kidlitcon 2010, the fourth annual conference for children’s and young adult book bloggers. Author Maggie Stiefvater is the keynote speaker. I have read and loved all of her books published to date, and am looking forward to meeting her. I’ll be participating in a few of the sessions (more details closer to the conference). But do check out the whole schedule. Kidlitcon has something for everyone involved in children’s book writing and blogging. And it’s not too late to register! As hosts Andrew Karre, Ben Barnhart and Brian Farrey note: “This conference belongs to bloggers and will only be as strong as those who make it happen.” I hope to see you all there!

Great times in children’s and young adult literature land. Wishing you all a book-filled weekend.

© 2010 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson’s Book Page. All rights reserved.
You can also find me on Twitter.
All Amazon links in this post are affiliate links, and may result in my receiving a small commission (with no additional cost to you).

Friday
Oct082010

2010 Cybils Panels

From Jen Robinson’s Book Page

Cybils2010small Just a quick update to let you all know that the nominating and judging panels for the Cybils were announced last week. Here are direct links to each panel:

You can also follow the Cybils organizers on Twitter here, the Young Adult panelists here, and an ever-growing set of all of the 2010 panelists, maintained by Amy Baskin, here.

And here are some comments from Anne Levy, Cybils co-founder and champion, about the selection of panelists:

At last count, more than 190 people volunteered for roughly 110 spots (give or take a few, I really haven’t counted lately). Inevitably, some of you will be disappointed. It wasn’t personal. Honest.

We tried to achieve a balance on each panel. We wanted a mix of occupations, genders, regions, ethnicity, etc. Some veteran judges weren’t asked back so we could make room for more newcomers. A few people impressed us with the combined reach of their blogs, tweets and Facebook presence. Still others have such a masterful command of their favorite genre that we knew it would be a poorer contest without their expertise.

Read Anne’s full post here.

For those of you who volunteered but were not selected, please know that the organizers were sad not to be able to include you this time around. They did their best to put together the most balanced panels that they could. It was especially difficult because certain categories (like young adult fiction) were very popular this year. If you weren’t selected, please do try again next year. And we hope that you’ll still participate in the Cybils by blogging, tweeting, following us on Facebook, supporting our sponsors, or buying Cybils bling. And, most importantly, by nominating books.

Nominations for the 2010 Cybils open this Friday, October 1st. Anyone can nominate titles, one book per category. Visit the Cybils blog on Friday for more details. Thanks for your interest in the Cybils!

© 2010 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson’s Book Page. All rights reserved.
You can also find me on Twitter.
All Amazon links in this post are affiliate links, and may result in my receiving a small commission (with no additional cost to you).

Friday
Oct082010

The Cybils Are Coming!

From Jen Robinson’s Book Page

Cybils2010small Read any good children’s or young adult books this year? Now is the time to start thinking about which ones you think are the best of the best. Because nominations for the 2010 Cybils open October 1st. The Cybils, of course, are the Children’s and Young Adult Bloggers’ Literary Awards, given each year to books (in a range of categories) that demonstrate both kid-appeal and literary merit.

This is the fifth year of the Cybils awards. I’ve been involved since year one, sometimes as a category organizer (for young adult fiction and for middle grade/young adult nonfiction), generally as a round 2 judge in one category or another, and currently as Literacy Evangelist (cheerleader/promoter/person who has been an organizer since the beginning and has some context to offer). Although I have very limited time for my blog this year (hello Baby Bookworm), I chose to stay involved with the Cybils because I believe strongly in what the Cybils awards stand for.

First of all, the Cybils are about winnowing through the many books published each year to find a few in each category that are especially well-written and kid-friendly. I’ve said many times that I believe that one of the most important things that comes out of the Cybils process is the shortlists that are published at the end of round one. The shortlists are lists of five to seven top titles in each category (a couple of the categories are further split by age range, for a total of about a dozen short lists). The shortlists are tremendously valuable, for parents, teachers, librarians, and children’s literature fans of all ages.

The other thing that is wonderful about the Cybils is that there are ways for lots of people to contribute. Anyone can nominate titles (one book per category). The people who make the shortlists, and pick the winners in each category, are bloggers who have demonstrated expertise in that area. I think it’s a nice mix. And because there are so many categories, lots of people are able to be involved in the process.

What’s going on with the Cybils right now is that judging panels are being formed. What I can tell you from my behind-the-scenes viewpoint is that the organizers in the nine categories (ranging from picture books to young adult titles) are making a tremendous effort to assemble well-balanced panels. They are striving for a mix of new and returning panelists, and a range of perspectives and job experiences on each panel. Unfortunately, not everyone who volunteers can get a spot on a panel - one price of success of the awards is that we have more volunteers than we have room for. But I promise you that the organizers are doing their best to include as many people as they can, while making the strongest panels that they can. Panels will be announced starting Monday.

For more about the Cybils, check out:

  • Gina Ruiz’s post at AmoXcalli about the Cybils: Year 5, the reflections of a first-year panelist and current organizer. And while you’re there, stop and leave a comment to welcome Gina back to blogging at AmoXcalli, after a year-long absence. Gina is the Social Media Guru for the Cybils. She urges: “Follow us on Twitter, fan us on Facebook, support us by buying Cybils swag and sport our bling on your blogs and websites. Most of all get those nominations in and keep reading!”
  • Sherry Early’s post about the “unexpected treasure” that she’s found through the Cybils at Semicolon, a post that she wrote as part of Book Blogger Appreciation Week. Sherry was also a first-year panelist for the Cybils. She says: “I don’t know if I’ll be judging for the Cybils this year or not, but I’m so hooked that I’ll be there on October 1 to nominate my favorites, and I’ll be reading as many of the nominated titles as I can find whether I’m judging or not. Cybils is great place to dig for unexpected treasure.
  • For further reading, bios of all of the Cybils organizers are now available on the Cybils blog.

Stay tuned! It’s just starting to get interesting.

© 2010 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson’s Book Page. All rights reserved.
You can also find me on Twitter.
All Amazon links in this post are affiliate links, and may result in my receiving a small commission (with no additional cost to you).

Saturday
Apr032010

Saturday Afternoon Visits: April 3

From Jen Robinson’s Book Page

It’s been another eventful week around the Kidlitosphere. Here are some links, for your perusal:

NPM_LOGO_2008_final April is National Poetry Month. There are a host of activities going on around the Kidlitosphere in celebration. Happily, Laura Evans of All Things Poetry has compiled a list (which I in turn copied from Finding Wonderland - you can find more details there):

Beautifulbloggeraward1 Lovely_award This week I was honored to receive not one but two blog awards from Dawn Little of Literacy Toolbox. Like my co-honoree Terry Doherty, I’m not one to pass along awards like this - I don’t like picking sub-sets of my favorite blogs, according to anyone else’s criteria. But I am delighted to be in such wonderful company with the other names on Dawn’s list.

I was also happy to have my blog listed as a resource recently on the Education and Social Sciences Library (ESSL) Children’s Literature Blog. Katelyn Edds chose a selection of blogs based on “how often the blogs were updated, their layout and content, and how often the blogs were cited by others as being authoritative.” I’m in excellent company there, too, with blogs like Fuse #8, Readergirlz, and Guys Lit Wire, to name a few.

Speaking of Terry Doherty, her writer’s prompt at Booklights this month is a fun one - Mad Libs. Oh, how I loved Mad Libs when I was in middle school. She talks about some different versions of the Mad Libs idea, shares some memories, and discusses why Mad Libs and related word games are an excellent literacy tool. Fun stuff! Ann also talks about writing prompts for kids in her monthly Booklights post. Great minds thinking alike, I guess.

Dayglo Accredited Online Colleges has a fun post this week: 10 Children’s Books Every Business Student Should read. It’s a nice mix of older and newer titles, and includes Chris Barton’s The Day-Glo Brothers. Thanks to Emma Taylor for the link.

Liz B responds at Tea Cozy to a recent New York Times article by Julie Just about problem parents in young adult literature. I agree 100% with Liz’s conclusion: “Just as parents need to get out of the way for their teenagers to mature into adults, so should we adults who read and review young adult books get out of the way of the intended audience — the teens. Yes, we can read and enjoy those books; but let’s not ask for those books to be written to reflect our reality of adults and parents.” But do read the whole post. Monica Edinger chimes in on the Times piece, too, though more briefly.

At the Book Whisperer, Donalyn Miller continues her series on resources to help teachers discover books for kids. This time, she discusses Twitter (where you can find her at @DonalynBooks). She gives tons of great examples of the fun that is following the kidlit twitterverse.  

MACLogo The NCBLA blog reports on the start of the Exquisite Corpse Adventure Mystery Author Contest. The idea is for school classes to “Play Twenty Questions with other Exquisite Corpse Adventure readers around the country to help identify The Mystery Author! Every class that solves the mystery and emails in the correct guess will be entered into a drawing to win a collection of books valued at over $500 for their classroom or library, plus a phone conversation with The Mystery Author!”

Quick Hits:

  • I haven’t mentioned it in a while, and thought that I would draw your attention to the latest installment of Sherry Early’s Saturday Review of Books at Semicolon. Every week, Sherry asks contributors to link to their reviews from the week - resulting in links to dozens of book reviews.
  • Mitali Perkins shares an inspiring plea from 8th grader Anisha N. on behalf of her school library. 
  • Lenore’s International Book Blogger Mentor program is up and running. She shares some of the featured bloggers at Presenting Lenore.
  • At the Tidy Books blog, Ian Newbold is wondering whether or not children’s books should come with warnings (e.g. if a character dies).
  • Doret wraps up her fun 9 Authors - 12 Baseball Questions series at TheHappyNappyBookseller.
  • If you need more kidlitosphere news, check out the latest FuseNews from Betsy Bird at A Fuse #8 Production. There are also some interesting news links in Joanne Meier’s Food for Thought post at Reading Rockets this week.
  • And finally, Kate Coombs has this week’s Poetry Friday roundup at Book Aunt.

Redsoxlogo I’ll be away from the computer tomorrow, celebrating Easter as well as baseball’s Opening Day (finally!). Wishing you all a Happy Easter or Passover, or anything else that you might celebrate, and a happy spring.

© 2010 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson’s Book Page. All rights reserved.
You can also find me on Twitter and at Booklights from PBS Parents.
All Amazon links in this post are affiliate links, and may result in my receiving a small commission (with no additional cost to you).

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