News

This page features news in the area of children’s literature, events from around the blogging community, and announcements about KidLitosphere happenings. Primarily focused on literary news, special events, useful articles, and interesting posts from other blogs, it does not include reviews, interviews, or opinions.

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Entries in Readergirlz (24)

Friday
Dec112009

Friday Visits: December 11

From Jen Robinson’s Book Page

Given the bustle of the holiday season, I’ve had trouble keeping up with Kidlitosphere news lately. But here are some highlights from the past couple of weeks (at least those that I think are still timely).

Cybils2009-150pxMichelle is running a Cybils Award Challenge at Galleysmith. She says: “The Cybils Award Challenge is where participants are encouraged to read from The Cybils Award nominees for the given year.” The challenge runs through the end of 2010, so you have plenty of time to participate.

Speaking of the Cybils, several Cybils bloggers were nominated for this year’s EduBlog awards. You can find the list at the Cybils blog. And, of course, it’s not too late to use the Cybils nomination lists (and past short lists) to help with your holiday shopping!

Speaking of holidays, in honor of Hanukkah, I’d like to bring to your attention a podcast at The Book of Life, in which Heidi EstrinEsme Raji CodellMark Blevis, and Richard Michelson discuss a variety of topics, including their predicted winners for the 2010 Sydney Taylor Book Award. For my Jewish readers, I wish you all a Happy Hanukkah!

Book lists abound this time of year. I mentioned several in Monday’s post at Booklights, but have a few new ones to share here. Lee Wind offers a list of GLBTQ books for middle schoolers. Another list I like a lot is Kate Messner’s list of her favorite 2009 titles, broken into creative categories (starting with my favorite, dystopias). Colleen Mondor has an excellent three-part piece with book recommendations for girls from several authors (the regular participants in Colleen’s What a Girl Wants series). And, Library Lady from Read it Again, Mom! shares her lists of Best Picture Books of the Decade and Best Chapter Books of the Decade. Finally, for a fun list of movies, Susan Taylor Brown shares over 200 movies about the literary life.

Newlogorg200This is very late news, but the Readergirlz author of the month is Tamora PierceLittle Willow has all the details at Bildungsroman.

Liz B. at Tea Cozy was inspired by the recent School Library Journal cover controversy to start a list of “books where an alcoholic (including recovering alcoholic) is portrayed as something other than the evil, abusive person”. (Have I shared that? People were offended because the librarians mentioned in Betsy Bird’s SLJ article on blogging were shown on the cover having drinks in a bar.). Also from Liz, see the William C. Morris YA Debut Award shortlist.

Speaking of recent controversies, Steph Su has a thoughtful post on the recent situation by which certain young adult titles were removed from a Kentucky classroom in Montgomery County (see details here). What I especially like about Steph’s post is that she links to comments from a blogger who she doesn’t agree with, so that she can understand both sides of the debate. My personal take is that the county superintendent is using a specious argument about academic rigor to remove books that he finds personally offensive from the classroom. See also commentary on this incident from Laurie Halse AndersonColleen Mondor, and Liz Burns.

Quick hits:

And that’s all I have for you today. I hope that you find some tidbits worth reading, and that I can do better at keeping up with the Kidlitosphere news in the future. Happy weekend, all!

© 2009 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson’s Book Page. All rights reserved.
You can also find me on Twitter and at Booklights from PBS Parents.
All Amazon links in this post are affiliate links, and may result in my receiving a small commission (with no additional cost to you).

Wednesday
Nov042009

Wednesday Afternoon Visits: November 4

From Jen Robinson’s Book Page

It’s been a pretty active week around the Kidlitosphere. Here are a few links for you.

Bigbird-hpToday is Sesame Street’s 40th birthday. Happy Birthday to Cookie Monster, Oscar, and the rest of the crew. One of my earliest memories is of singing “C is for Cookie, that’s good enough for me” in the car. According to this news release, “Google, an innovator in the world of technology, has partnered with Sesame Workshop, the nonprofit educational organization behind Sesame Street, to create original “Google doodles.”  Starting today, Google will feature photographic depictions of the Sesame Street Muppets with the Google logo on its home page from November 4-10.” Fun stuff!

Colleen Mondor has posted the latest installment in her “What a Girl Wants” series (a set of roundtable discussions that she’s hosting with a panel of authors) at Chasing Ray. This week’s topic is: mean girls in literature. Colleen asks: “did literature create the myth of mean girls or have the reality of mean girls created accompanying literature?” As usual in this smart series, the responses extend in a variety of intriguing directions.

Newlogorg200The Readergirlz will be celebrating Native American Heritage Month for November, spotlighting Marlene Carvell’s novel Sweetgrass Basket at readergirlz. In her customary organized manner, Little Willow has all the details.

At Pixie Stix Kids PixKristen McLean takes on “the Amazon Vine brouhaha kicked off by Betsy Bird over at Fuse #8 last week”, saying “I think this discussion has some larger implications for the industry, which is why it’s going to continue to get play.” She begins by discussing the lack of transparency in the Amazon program, and moves on from there.

Picking up on another Betsy Bird article (her recent SLJ piece about KidLit blogs), Roger Sutton asks at Read Roger ”whether or not there is such a thing as a blog-friendly book”, if “some books more than others will appeal to people who like to blog about children’s books.” He also makes some interesting points about the usefulness (or lack thereof) of blogs for libraries researching for their book collections, in context of “The glory and the bane of book blogging is its variety”.

Speaking of Betsy’s SLJ article, Liz B. has a fun piece about the photo shoot for the cover at Tea Cozy. Betsy’s article also inspired in librarian Ms. Yingling some philosophical musings on why she blogs. She also makes the excellent point that “The more good people we have commenting on books, the easier it is for the rest of us to keep on top of the huge number of new books that are coming out”. 

Cybils2009-150pxAnne Levy is running a new contest on the Cybils website related to NaNoWriteMo (where people try to write a whole book in November). Well, actually she links to a contest, and then also asks people to share 50 word blurbs from their NaNoWriteMo projects, for publication on the Cybils blog. Fun stuff! 

Mitali Perkins recently announced an ALA Midwinter Kid/YA Lit Tweetup. She says: “Coming to Boston for the ALA Midwinter conference? If you’re a tweeting librarian, author, illustrator, publisher, agent, editor, reviewer, blogger, or anyone interested in children’s and YA lit, join us on January 16, 2010 from 4-6 in the Birch Bar at Boston’s Westin Waterfront Hotel.” Still not enough to make me wish that I still lived in Boston as winter approaches, but this comes close…

AlltheworldIt looks like blogging friend Liz Garton Scanlon is going to have her picture book, All the World (with Marla Frazee), included in the Cheerios Spoonful of Stories program next year. Congratulations, Liz! Liz shares some other good news for the book at Liz in Ink.

Sixth grade language arts teacher Sarah asked at the Reading Zone for “a few “words of wisdom” for a presentation” on reading aloud to middle school students. There’s some good input in the comments. It’s an inspiring post all around, actually.

Quick hits:

© 2009 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson’s Book Page. All rights reserved.
You can also find me on Twitter and at Booklights from PBS Parents.
All Amazon links in this post are affiliate links, and may result in my receiving a small commission (with no additional cost to you).

Sunday
Oct042009

Sunday Afternoon Visits: October 4

From Jen Robinson’s Book Page

I did a pretty thorough Kidlitosphere roundup on Wednesday (though some of you may have missed it, because I was having some temporary technical problems with my blog this week - apologies). Anyway, I have just a few additional links to share with you today.

Cybils2009-150pxFirst up, the Cybils nomination process is going strong. As I write this, there have been more than 400 eligible nominations. There have been some great, great titles nominated. You can view the lists of nominated titles (complete with cover images, and the name of the person who nominated each book), here:

We’ve also been continuing to roll out profiles of Cybils organizers, lists of panelists, and introductions to the various categories. There are too many posts to link to - I recommend that you go to the Cybils blog, and check it out. You can also follow the Cybils on Twitter. Last, but not least, you can find some great tips for new Cybils panelists at Abby (the) Librarian.

At A Chair, A Fireplace and a Tea Cozy, Liz B. offers an introduction to Poetry Friday, and a thank you to PF founder Kelly Herold. (Liz also links to Susan Thomsen’s previously written and definitive intro to PF). Fittingly, this week’s Poetry Friday roundup is at Crossover, Kelly’s new blog. Like Liz, I don’t end up participating in Poetry Friday all that often these days. I have trouble with scheduled events, beyond my own roundups and PBS posts and so on. But I still think that Poetry Friday is one of the jewels of the Kidlitosphere, a weekly celebration of poetry, spread across a variety of different blogs, completely volunteer run, and fully democratic.

Ellen Hopkins continues to face book challenge drama. She says: “the superintendent of schools in Moore OK … preemptively pulled all my books from all her schools “as a precaution.”” Nice. Don’t even put the book banners to the trouble of mounting challenges - just remove everything. Maureen has a roundup of some other Banned Book Week links at Confessions of a BibliovoreColleen Mondor shares her thoughts on several related topics (with lots of discussion in the comments) at Chasing Ray.

At The Happy Accident, Greg Pincus has a great post about #kidlitchat, Twitter, and community. He explains the goal that he and Bonnie Adamson had in starting the weekly chats in the first place (to build community), and the benefits that are already coming out of these sessions. Like this one: “Each member of our individual networks sees our passion and, if they want, can see our community in action – sharing, laughing, supporting, learning. We can be emissaries for children’s literature as a group, far more than we can as individuals.” How great is that?

Quick hits:

  • Pam Coughlan has some new details about KidLitCon at MotherReader, as well as links to some external articles that show why authors can’t “afford not to invest in learning more about blogging, social media, and online presence.”
  • Sherry has a new installment of her Saturday Review of Books at Semicolon. This is a regular Semicolon feature, in which a host of bloggers submit links to a review from the week (it’s supposed to one review, but lots of people apparently link to all of these reviews). Anyway, it’s a nice place for browsing.
  • At Literacy, families, and learning, Trevor Cairney has a detailed piece about the importance of historical fiction, and why children should be encouraged to read it. He gives lots of examples.
  • Monica Edinger links from Educating Alice to some points at the SLJ Heavy Medal blog on the Newbery Award, audience, and insensitivity. She calls it “Hard stuff, but important. Highly recommended.”
  • Esme Raji Codell has a fun post at PlanetEsme highlighting “great new books about books and writing”.
  • Abby (the) Librarian has a few more links in her Around the Interwebs post from Friday. Karen has still more links at Teenage Fiction for the Ages, in her Links from the Blogosphere post. And still more from Gwenda Bond at Shaken & Stirred and from Book Dads in their Weekend Wander.
  • There’s a nice post at the ESSL Children’s Literature Blog from Nancy O’Brien listing children’s literature on multicultural families.
  • The featured author at Readergirlz this month is Libba Bray.
  • At 100 Scope Notes, Travis posts several Wild Things links. Are you interested in Where the Wild Things Are tattoos? I’ll bet Betsy is. And just in case that’s not enough Wild Things news for you, Elaine Magliaro links to a Boston Globe article about how Maurice Sendak made the world safe for monsters.
  • And in closing, my favorite blog post of the weekLaini Taylor posted photos of her husband, Jim di Bartolo, reading to their baby. She’s looking straight at the book. She’s smiling. The photos are perfect! Do click through. They’ll brighten your day.

And that’s all for today. Hope you’ve all been having a lovely weekend!

© 2009 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson’s Book Page. All rights reserved.
You can also find me on Twitter and at Booklights from PBS Parents.
All Amazon links in this post are affiliate links, and may result in my receiving a small commission (with no additional cost to you).

Wednesday
Sep302009

Wednesday Afternoon Visits: September 30

From Jen Robinson’s Book Page

I begin to think that the sheer impossibility of keeping up with the news from around this Kidlitosphere is a permanent condition. Particularly when, as was the case last weekend, I have trips. But here’s my best effort to capture the news from the past week. Hope that you find it useful.

ECA-main-title3I’ve been following the news about the NCBLA/Library of Congress/Jon Scieszka project, The Exquisite Corpse Adventure. The project was officially launched at last weekend’s National Book Festival. The idea is for the project to be “a buoyant, spontaneous experiment; a progressive story game just like the one many families play on road trips, at camps, at parties, at home when there is a power outage… Members of The Exquisite Corpse Adventure “motley crew” are, in reality, some of the most gifted artists and storytellers in our nation, award-winners all—M.T. Anderson, Natalie Babbitt, Calef Brown, Susan Cooper, Kate Di Camillo, Timothy Basil Ering, Nikki Grimes, Shannon Hale, Daniel Handler aka Lemony Snicket, Steven Kellogg, Gregory Maguire, Megan McDonald, Patricia and Fredrick McKissack, Linda Sue Park, Katherine Paterson, James Ransome, Jon Scieszka, and Chris Van Dusen.” If you follow the NCBLA’s blog, you’ll be notified easily about each new episode (new episodes will be published every two weeks for the next year). You can also (I learned from Leila at Bookshelves of Doom) follow a special RSS feed for the new ECA posts alone).

NcblalogoI must confess to being particularly pleased because, as part of a Literacy Resource Treasure Chest accompanying the Exquisite Corpse Adventure (prepared by the National Children’s Book and Literacy Alliance and the Butler Children’s Literature Center at Dominican University), the team published a list of “Blogs that Inspire”. And, well, my blog is listed, along with several other amazing blogs (see Fuse 8’s thoughts here). I must say, this made my week. But in general, the page offers nice one-stop shopping for many of the literacy organizations that Terry Doherty and I talk about all the time. It is truly an honor to be included.

3961914637_3993283a87Moving on, there have been tons of articles about on Banned Book Week, too many for me to link to here (but check out Finding Wonderland, for a range of posts, and Lee Wind’s challenged author roundtable discussion). But my attention was caught by this article from Boston.com, sent to me by my friend Alex from Outside In. It’s an op-ed piece by Julianna Baggott about an embattled teacher’s response to potential “objectionable material” in books. Here’s the part that got me: “The overwhelmingly sad thing for me was the sound of fear in this woman’s voice and her utter lack of conviction in the things that probably once inspired her to become a teacher in the first place - the way someone can talk about the world of books, the power of the imagination, and change a child’s life.”

Mimlogo_smLori Calabrese reports that Saturday (October 3rd) is Make it Matter Day. She says: “Reader’s Digest, Reading Is Fundamental, and other organizations are partnering to bring learning to life for Reader’s Digest’s National Make It Matter Day, this Saturday (October 3rd). Members of local communities as well as local and national organizations will rally behind literacy and education in over 100 events at select schools, Boys & Girls Clubs, YMCAs, and libraries across the U.S.” She also offers concrete suggestions for participating.

What-book-2Today is the last day to vote in First Book’s What Book Got You Hooked? campaign. The First Book blog says: “Don’t forget to cast your vote for the book that got you hooked and the state to receive 50,000 new books. Voting is open through 12:00 am midnight ET TONIGHT, September 30!”

Quick hits:

  • At SemicolonSherry Early vents about the “torn between two lovers device” in literature and film. Now me, I find this compelling, when done well. But I still enjoyed Sherry’s post.  
  • By way of followup to last week’s What A Girl Wants column, which lamented the way that socioeconomic woes are often ignored in children’s and young adult fiction, Colleen Mondor discusses two recent books that do take economic struggles into account (Operation Yes by Sara Lewis Holmes and Heart of a Shepherd by Rosanne Parry, two books that I loved. See also Sara’s YES interview with Rosanne.)
  • Greg Pincus shares 10 Facebook Status Update Ideas at The Happy Accident. I also liked Greg’s earlier post about 10 Golden Rules for Engaging Via Social Media, created with Mark Blevis.
  • Ann has an interesting post about picture book end papers at Booklights today. See also Terry’s post from yesterday about celebrating culture with books, in honor of National Hispanic Heritage Month. I’m also somewhat attached to Gina’s Show and Tale selection for this week: Harriet the Spy.
  • Mary Pearson writes at Tor about the unsung hero of literature: setting.
  • Becky from Becky’s Book Reviews explains her reading challenge addiction.
  • Sarah shares “hot books” from her middle school classroom at The Reading Zone. Sarah also shared a lovely success story recently, about creating a lifelong reader.
  • Susan Taylor Brown is seeking your favorite unsung kidlit blogs by authors and illustrators for a top-secret project.
  • At Roots in Myth, PJ Hoover suggests that parent-son book clubs would help engage more boys in reading. There are many, many interested and supportive comments on this subject.
  • Speaking of boys and reading, Lori Calabrese highlights Gotcha for Guys: nonfiction books to get boys excited about reading.
  • Kudos to DaughterReader (and proud MotherReader) for her recent National Book Festival success doing a dramatic reading with Mo Willems.
  • Kate Coombs (Book Aunt) writes about her observation that story books (one step up from picture books, including fairy tales, written to be read to slightly older kids) are losing ground fast.
  • I was traveling and didn’t have a chance to participate, but Sunday’s 7 Kicks from the 7-Imps featured one of my favorite characters, Andrea Beaty’s Ted (of Doctor Ted fame, now reinvented as Fireman Ted).
  • Liz B has the scoop on the Simon & Schuster Blogfest 2009 at Tea Cozy. Liz also had a post over that weekend about whether or not it should be viewed as negative to want to understand how something like the Book Blogger Appreciation Week awards worked. There is a LOT of discussion about transparency in the comments.
  • Speaking of transparency, the Readergirlz Divas recently shared an explanation of how they choose the books that they feature each month.
  • At Shelf ElfKerry Millar has a post highlighting three authors who she thinks are also great bloggers (including the reasons why). I certainly agree with her choices.
  • Justine Larbalestier has a bit of a rant on the current obsession with dwelling on an author’s age (as in, “isn’t it amazing that he wrote this book by the age of … whatever”).

Whew! That’s it for today. Later this week I’ll be working on literacy news and reviews. And, of course, following the Cybils nominations. And preparing for KidLitCon. And … wouldn’t it be nice to have time to read books sometime? Thanks for reading!

© 2009 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson’s Book Page. All rights reserved.
You can also find me on Twitter and at Booklights from PBS Parents.
All Amazon links in this post are affiliate links, and may result in my receiving a small commission (with no additional cost to you).

Wednesday
Sep232009

Wednesday Afternoon Visits: September 23

From Jen Robinson’s Book Page

There is way too much going on around the Kidlitosphere for me to wait until the end of the week to share the news. Here are a few highlights:

Newlogorg200Readergirlz announced their latest initiative for Teen Read Week: Read Beyond Reality. Here’s a snippet: “Teen Read Week, a week-long celebration of literacy, is scheduled for Oct. 18-24, 2009, and will include live chats with top teen authors on readergirlz.com, the most popular online reading community for teen girls… In support of this tremendous literary initiative, the readergirlz divas will host nine young-adult authors—eight of whom are nominees for the Teens’ Top Ten—throughout Teen Read Week.” You can read the full press release here. There’s also a downloadable post here, and a trailer here.

Betsy Bird at A Fuse #8 Production reports on the new and improved Guys Read website from National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature Jon Scieszka. She says: “I’m talking new look, new blog, cool recommendations, and funny funny funny.” Books are in categories like “how to build stuff” and “robots”. 

Cybils2009-150pxThe Cybils blog remained active this week. On Monday, deputy editor Sarah Stevenson posted the latest Cybils organizer profile, this one featuring Susan Thomsen from Chicken Spaghetti, this year’s MG/YA Nonfiction category administrator. Then today she posted the profile for our Easy Reader panel organizer, Anastasia Suen. The other big Cybils news is that we’ve started announcing panelists for the categories. Here, you’ll find the list of panelists (for both rounds) for the Easy Reader and Short Chapter Books category. Our other amazing panels will be announced soon!

At Chasing Ray, Colleen Mondor has a new installment of her What A Girl Wants Series, in which she engages in discussion with a variety of young adult authors. This installment’s theme is “because we are not all rich girls”. Colleen says: “The great swath of the American public however have actual jobs - blue collar or white collar they simply go to work to get a paycheck. In teen literature this is often not part of the equation and it left me wondering what that means to so many kids who can not ignore the money or how they live because of it.” A number of authors share smart, insightful responses.  

KidLitCon-badgeMotherReader announced the charity that will benefit from this year’s KidLitCon raffle. She says: “This year I’ve turned to Donors Choose for our charity, and specifically to impoverished Washington, DC, schools. At this point I’ve selected two proposals to fund. I picked Literacy is Fun-damental because they need Spanish language books, which are hard to pick up at a discount or at a local book sale, and because the picture of the kids is soooo cute. I picked It All Starts With Reading! because they need titles for teens, and the picture of the empty bookcase is soooo sad.” She’s also accepting prize donations for the raffle, if anyone is interested. You can also see the updated list of people scheduled to attend, at the bottom of this post.

Nancy_SilhouetteAngie from Angieville, one of my book selection kindred spirits, has a post up today about her favorite mystery series (something that I tackled last month). Of the seven she listed, I adore five of them (some were on my list, and some weren’t, but I love them all). A sixth is a second series by an author I’m currently working my way through, so I’m delighted to hear that the other series holds up, too. And the seventh, well, clearly I’ll have to check that one out. Because if Angie’s taste matches this well with mine, how could I possibly not want to read that one, too. Click through to see her choices. (And don’t you love the image, which I borrowed from Angie’s post?)

At Moms Inspire LearningDawn Morris has a two-part interview with Terry Doherty from The Reading Tub. (Terry is, as regular readers know, my partner in the weekly children’s literacy roundups). The interview is Dawn’s launch of a new “Moms Inspire Moms” series. She talks with Terry about how and why Terry started The Reading Tub (a nonprofit designed to “make it easy for families to create a positive reading environment at home, find great books … and make it accessible to EVERYONE!”), as well as Terry’s personal experience in raising her daughter, Catherine, to be a reader. Then (in an echo of the paired interviews that were my favorite part of last week’s Book Blogger Appreciation Week), Terry interviews Dawn about Moms Inspire Learning (“Simple Resources and Strategies to Inspire Lifelong Learning, Reading, and Leading”). Dawn shares tips for teaching kids to read, and also talks about inspiring kids to write. She even has a Read Aloud Recipe for a Garden of Reading. Very nice!

Quick hits:

  • Natasha from Maw Books has a very fun post about how she manages to blog with two small children in her house. It’s a visual - click through to see. I also really liked her BBAW wrap-up post, in which she spotlighted several blogs that she learned about through the whole event.
  • The Brown Bookshelf is looking for submissions for their flagship 28 Days Later event. Their blog says: “We are looking for submissions of African American children’s authors who are flying under the radar of teachers, librarians, parents and anyone who considers themselves a gatekeeper to a child’s reading choices.”
  • As reported by Lauren Barack in School Library Journal’s Extra Helping, Thursday (the 24th) is National Punctuation Day.
  • Friday is the deadline to submit entries for the September Carnival of Children’s LiteratureSusan Taylor Brown is hosting, and asks for your favorite post of the month.
  • Elaine Magliaro shares a list of fall-themed picture books and poetry at Wild Rose Reader.
  • This week’s Nonfiction Monday roundup was at Bookends. Also not to be missed, at Tea Cozy Liz B. shares a thank you post in honor of Nonfiction Monday creator Anastasia Suen.
  • I don’t usually highlight author interviews, but I did especially enjoy Sherrie Petersen’s recent interview of fellow Kidlitosphere member, and Any Which Wall author, Laurel Snyder.
  • This seems to be my week for highlighting interviews, because I was also pleased to see author Justine Larbalestier interview blogger Doret from TheHappyNappyBookseller (about young adult fiction featuring girls playing sports, complete with recommendations).
  • Karen at Teenage Fiction for All Ages reported earlier this week that the shortlists for the Booktrust Teenage Prize have been selected. Would you imagine? The Graveyard Book is on the list. Winners will be announced November 18th. Tasha Saecker also has the shortlist, with cover images.
  • Persnickety Snark is hosting an international celebration of young adult book bloggers. Link via Leila from Bookshelves of Doom.
  • Kidliterate has launched a new feature called Old Release Tuesdays, with videos highlighting older titles that Melissa and Sarah enjoy selling. I think it’s a nice idea! 
  • Laurie Halse Anderson has an important post, written in response to recent attempts to remove two of her books (Speak and Twisted) from high school classrooms. I especially liked this part: “I used to get really angry at these things because I felt they were a personal attack on me. Then I grew up. Now I get angry because book banning is bad for my country. It is an attack on the Constitution and about the core ideals of America. It is the tool of people who want to control and manipulate our children.”
  • Speaking of book challenges, Leila has an update to the recent Ellen Hopkins book challenge (which I mentioned last week), at Bookshelves of Doom.
  • And Donalyn Miller, the Book Whisperer, has some suggestions in honor of Banned Book Week, too. She recaps several recent challenges, and offers criteria for teachers “to prevent book challenges and parent complaints before they occur”.

And that’s it for today. I do have lots of reviews that I’ve starred in my reader, but I’m not sure when I’ll have time for a “reviews that made me want the book” feature. Soon, I hope. Happy reading!

© 2009 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson’s Book Page. All rights reserved.
You can also find me on Twitter and at Booklights from PBS Parents.
All Amazon links in this post are affiliate links, and may result in my receiving a small commission (with no additional cost to you).